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Add to Wish List. Introduction 1. Aim This dissertation is concerned with the language use of two Democratic politicians who are candidates for the United States presidential election of November 4 thnamely Hillary Clinton, senator for New York and Barack Obama, senator for Illinois. Medan University of Sumatera Utara. Kissine, Mikhail. She belongs to the Democratic.

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Military project management resume

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Another popular field for those making the military to civilian transition is management. There are so many industries that utilize management positions — from administrative services and advertising to information technology and construction industries, the possibilities are almost endless. Now, seeing other military to civilian resume samples can show you the best way to get your foot in the door of the logistics or management industry.

Making the transition from a military career to a civilian one doesn't have to be difficult. The first step is a great resume that lands you an interview. TopResume offers three levels of resume writing services with all of the components you need to make your job application the best it can be. We guarantee you'll get 2x more job interviews within 60 days or we'll rewrite your resume for free. Turn your resume into the helpful tool it's designed to be.

Use our resume writing service today! Get the information you need to land your dream job faster — delivered to your inbox, every week. Career advice is on its way. Menu Next Steps Where shall we send your critique? Email Address Get my critique. Thanks for submitting your files Thank you! Your critique is on the way. Read our expert career advice. Uploading your resume What Makes this Resume Work?

The above military to civilian resume sample works because: It's says what's in it for the employer. It's easy to talk about your strengths, skills, and past accomplishments, but how does that benefit the company for which you're applying? Your resume should show how you positively impacted your previous employers, whether through company growth, team success, project results or other accomplishments —not just list your job duties.

It uses quantitative information. Not only are numbers concise and easy to digest, the human mind naturally responds better to numbers compared to words. I tell recent graduates entering the workforce to tell me about their GPA and major but just as important tell me about what they did.

Highlight coursework that involved any project type work, especially those that were group projects. You should do the same. As far as being competitive with private sector candidates I think you have an edge there. There are far more constraints and regulations in the public sector than the private. It is much easier to think out of the box in the private sector.

I would argue that is not generally true. Working within those constraints calls for even more creativity. Play that up. I would be happy to look at what you have so far and help you translate your military experience into the language a private or public sector hiring manager is looking for.

In the meantime I would take a look at the Project Management Institute and consider obtaining certification. Your resume should demonstrate your ability as well as your experience. Army Lieutenant Colonel with management, leadership, and development experience in professional services, business management and military logistics. Here are some simple equivalents that will get you on your way. Continue on with more comparisons and you'll see how staff work translates to project management.

Hi Angela, I did the same transition from the military active duty to project management that you are looking to do. I love hiring former military service members, especially officers and senior enlisted, as they performed project management in one way shape or form every single day. Kevin hit it on the head. You need to take those things you did while in the Army and frame them into terms of the project management knowledge and processes. These fit into the five process groups or phases of project management which are initiating, planning, executing, managing and controlling, and closing.

What I look for in a resume is for an applicant to quantify what they did during their career and fit them into these areas. The way I did it was too first to write down the major exercises, deployments, inspections, or other activities I performed during my career. Then I wrote down what I did for each of these events.

Lastly, I framed them into the project management knowledge areas and phases. I would recommend that you check into this as I am seeing more and more clients who are requiring their project managers to be PMP certified. I would be more than happy to take a look at your resume and give you my feedback from what I am looking for when I hire.

If you are interested, please send it to michael. Projects are temporary temporary endeavor with a beginning and end date and creates a unique product, service, result outcome. As a platoon leader, executive officer and operations officer, you most likely have worked on many projects and they do qualify towards 4, hours project management requirement.

However, when you describe projects, know that operations work will not qualify. Operations work is on-going and repetitive and follows organizations existing procedures. Your title does not matter to PMI even if you have been operations officer as long as you have done projects as a part of your job functions.

In traditional management, a project goes through initiation developing charter and identifying stakeholders , planning developing project management plan , execution carrying out the work , monitoring and control comparing project management plan and work performance information from your execution process group and close close procurement and close project. Above-mentioned work sounds like a part of project but you may want to describe project work by using PMI terminologies when you submit your application to PMI or on your resume.

Although I haven't served in the military, i am the father of an army infantry vet that has served 8 years with three tours two in I have over 30 years managing people, projects, and technical designs. I hope I can shed some light on this question for you. In PM terms these three things are referred to as the iron triangle. As you already know from your military experience, you can look at these three items as levers you can pull to help the project succeed.

You can add or change the people wrking on the project Resources , you can add or remove tasks and assignments for your team Scope , and you can accelrate or extend the timeline for a mission Schedule. How did you go about assessing risks and mitigating them. This is another valuable project management skill.

Your communication skills are vital and anything you can do to demonstrate them will work in your favor. Keep in mind that by communication I mean downward to team members , laterally to other project managers and peers , and upward to management. Use my profile email if you would like to take me up on this.

I am a former Infantry Officer in the Army. I am currently transitioning from the military looking to find employment in the private sector, specifically I found this question while performing a search through Google and realized how joining ACP would be an invaluable resource.

I will be transitioning from the Army this coming November and am interested in working in Project Management. After reading the advice everyone provided I am looking into getting PMP certification. The question I would like to ask is, and perhaps former veterans working as Project Managers can help me, does my time as a Platoon Leader, Executive Officer and Assistant S3 Operations Officer all count towards 4, hours of project management required for certification?

Correct me if I am mistaken but the planning, resourcing, execution and refinement of everything we did on a day-to-day basis is the same as project management in business, correct? Career spent in technology. I just want to amplify what a couple of others have mentioned here.

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Some of the positions in this field include project management, dispatching, transportation, warehouse careers and more. Another popular field for those making the military to civilian transition is management. There are so many industries that utilize management positions — from administrative services and advertising to information technology and construction industries, the possibilities are almost endless. Now, seeing other military to civilian resume samples can show you the best way to get your foot in the door of the logistics or management industry.

Making the transition from a military career to a civilian one doesn't have to be difficult. The first step is a great resume that lands you an interview. TopResume offers three levels of resume writing services with all of the components you need to make your job application the best it can be. We guarantee you'll get 2x more job interviews within 60 days or we'll rewrite your resume for free.

Turn your resume into the helpful tool it's designed to be. Use our resume writing service today! Get the information you need to land your dream job faster — delivered to your inbox, every week. Career advice is on its way.

Menu Next Steps Where shall we send your critique? Email Address Get my critique. Thanks for submitting your files Thank you! Your critique is on the way. Read our expert career advice. Uploading your resume What Makes this Resume Work? The above military to civilian resume sample works because: It's says what's in it for the employer. It's easy to talk about your strengths, skills, and past accomplishments, but how does that benefit the company for which you're applying?

Your resume should show how you positively impacted your previous employers, whether through company growth, team success, project results or other accomplishments —not just list your job duties. It uses quantitative information. Step 1 : Find a few job postings for roles that seem interesting to you. Step 2 : Copy and paste the job descriptions and requirements into a word cloud generator like wordle.

Step 3 : Copy and paste your resume into the word cloud generator and compare the words most frequently used here to those from the jobs you find interesting. Step 4 : Edit your resume as needed to highlight your most relevant experience using words similar to those used in the job postings. Quantify your bullets and show "awesome-factor. Every bullet on your resume should show that you added value in your role, not your job description. I like to describe this task in the following way: Let's pretend there's you, and there's someone else at your company with the exact same role.

Your peer is absolutely terrible at their job. Could that person, without lying, put your same bullet on their resume? If the answer is "yes" then that bullet isn't doing you any favors because it isn't showing your reader that you added value in your role. Even if your reader doesn't understand what you did in your job, if they can easily tell that you were great at it, they're going to find it much easier to extrapolate that you'd be good in other types of roles.

The easiest way to do this is to add numbers and impact to your bullets to answer the question "So what? Step 2: Assume that civilians don't know the order of military ranks — so if you are a lieutenant and you did work for a captain use descriptive language to explain why this is a big deal. Step 3: Have someone non-military look at your military experience and flag things that don't make sense.

The majority of hiring managers are looking for employees who are team players, problem-solvers, and leaders. The military folks I've worked with all have these characteristics and more grace under fire, resourcefulness, etc. She helps MBA students answer the question, "What do you want to be when you grow up?

She loves playing with her pit bull puppy and traveling. Related: For the latest veteran jobs postings around the country, visit the Military. Get your resume seen by companies that are seeking veterans like you. Post your resume with Monster.

Be sure to get the latest news about post-military careers as well as critical info about veteran jobs and all the benefits of service. Subscribe to Military. Financial Services is ranked the 5th best industry for veterans, a study from Navy Federal Credit Union says.

You can be a farmer with the USDA's help, but there's more opportunity in agriculture than you might think. Get special job alerts, offers and insider tips on making the most of your military experience in the civilian workforce. View more newsletters on our Subscriptions page. See all veteran friendly employers. Your resume is a form of self-marketing. It is not intended to just be a laundry list of your past experiences.

When you get right down to it, most people don't really understand other people's jobs, but there are a few tricks to keep in All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed. You May Also Like. Get the Veteran Jobs Newsletter Get special job alerts, offers and insider tips on making the most of your military experience in the civilian workforce. By signing up, you agree to our Privacy Notice.

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In addition to skills training, veterans and military spouses working at Amazon have access to fellowships, mentorships, military spouse support, and deployment benefits. They also have the Warriors Amazon affinity group, a community with more than 10, former service members, spouses, and allies across the company. Amazon currently has more than 35, positions open in the U.

To learn more about career opportunities for veterans and military spouses at Amazon, please visit here. Amazon is guided by four principles: customer obsession rather than competitor focus, passion for invention, commitment to operational excellence, and long-term thinking. For more information, visit amazon. Employee retention and motivation are interdependent and directly correlated. This means a good employee retention rate will reduce operational costs, allow you to outperform your direct competitors, build morale, and improve your customer service levels.

If someone leaves your company, you need to consider the opportunity cost and the impact of not having someone in that role for an extended period. It could wipe out a particular client. It could backlog a team, project, or experience.

You might now have to pay someone else overtime to compensate for the missing person. This may cause a snowball effect that can cycle into higher workloads, more stress, and sluggish morale. An active employee retention strategy is perhaps as important as your human resource manager. Two reasons.

Is this employee a seamless puzzle piece connector that will allow your project to move forward? If the answer is no, move on to a different candidate. Hire employees who align with all aspects of the business, from its mission to its working arrangement.

Ask employees specific behavioral questions throughout the hiring process to see how they react to certain situations. Not all employees are made equally. Some people like silence, some like a social environment. Some employees like adjustable standup desks, some like a super comfortable wheely chair.

Allow your employees to pick and choose how and where they would like to work while in the office. Craft different working stations throughout the office, including group tables with projection monitors for collaboration; social areas for snacking and chatting; silent rooms with shut doors and drawable blinds; and customizable individual workstations.

You and your business need to make sure you offer compensation that takes care of everyday expenses like food, housing, utilities, and fun. Most people want all of this compensation doubled. Do market research on wages within your country. Find the median salary for various titles throughout the company and determine what a competitive wage would be. Research some competitive benefits packages. Gone are the days when a good salary and a desk are good enough to attract top talent from the professional realm and the new era of university graduates.

Employees want good benefits, and the benefits you offer should be competitive. What are your closest competitors doing? Do it better. Health, retirement, transportation, and education benefits are some of the most common perks of accepting a new job.

Want to take it a step further? Introduce personalized benefits. Here the new employee can choose a handful of available perks that make the most sense to them. Human beings like being praised and rewarded for a job well done. They like to feel like their work is valuable, and making a difference in the company. Employees need encouragement and recognition to continue working their hardest. When an employee does something right or makes a measurable difference in its favor, show appreciation and happiness.

When they finish a gigantic and time-consuming project, and the results are as planned or better, give them a pat on the back or a small reward. It will show your employees that you appreciate them. The overall goal is to create a positive, challenging, and encouraging work environment that bolsters hard work, creativity, competitiveness, and happiness.

People leave companies. No matter how well you do, which processes you put in place, or how high you hike salaries, companies that foster great work will mold their employees to new heights. If your newly-groomed and model employee has found a better job elsewhere, fight for them. Then use your secret weapon — the exit interview. Craft your exit interview to include questions of happiness, pain points, frustrations, things your employee will miss, people they enjoyed, and recommendations for improvement.

Take them to heart and continue to improve your employee culture. In some ways, a remote job interview can seem like a welcome relief from the traditional format. The social awareness and mores around remote interviews are still emerging for those on both sides of the interaction. As you prepare for your next remote job interview, consider this inside scoop from several interviewers-their insights about what matters and what may be less important. Chit chat breaks the ice and can help make a remote conversation feel comfortable.

Come prepared with a couple of easy talking points to kick things off a funny story, a sports reference, etc. Remote interactions have their own unique brand of uncomfortable moments-glitches, freezes, etc. Acing remote interviews requires more focus than acing in-person interviews, in my opinion, because there are so many external factors like connectivity that affect the dialogue.

Rushing to fill the silence may lead you to say something that you might not normally say or fill it up with chatter, which would let the interviewer know you are nervous about the interview. You may want to practice with a friend to learn how to manage awkward silences and find appropriate times for small talk during an online interview.

Then mirror their approach. When it comes to remote interviews, though, the unexpected happens often, even when prepared. Being anxious and rigid makes it more painful to weather these inevitable occurrences. If you have a child who is likely to interrupt, tell your interviewer this at the beginning of the meeting! Rivera emphasizes the importance of the human touch. Discuss what has been hard, what has been good, how crazy everything is.

Humanity needs humanity now more than ever. Flexibility, adaptability, emotional intelligence, innovation, problem-solving, work ethic, and other soft skills are valuable. Soft skills can help finesse a changing workplace. Showcase them. I even interviewed someone with a parrot on her shoulder for the entire interview. All of that is wonderful. Just as you would with a face-to-face interview, do your interview prep before your meeting.

Learn about the organization and the professional culture as you think about presenting yourself for your interview. Click here to read the original article posted on Glassdoor. What happens next? Worse is the discovery that all of your practiced military tactics for addressing adversity may not get you anywhere. In fact, your attention to detail, commitment to teamwork and willingness to go all-in may be received as off-putting, aggressive and overwhelming. What the heck? Add to this the age-old challenge that is finding a job.

Or better yet, starting a career. The military promised career skills, and you built many good ones. But how do you apply them to the boggling ecosystem that is the civilian workforce? Where do you start? How do you get your foot in the door? It adds enormous stress to their transition process and compounds traumas like PTSD, depression and anxiety. There are myriad U. Best known for its three-week REBOOT workshop, NVTSI delivers an insightful and personalized program that equips Veterans with the emotional, psychological, social and professional skills they need to restructure and redefine their lives.

It addresses the personal and social aspects of transitioning to civilian life via research-based, outcome-driven methods drawn from career planning best practices and cognitive behavior techniques. How do you overcome that hurdle? All this information is helpful, but again, how does it get you in the door? How do you make that happen?

For all Veterans, securing a good job is a critical piece of the puzzle. CCS Global Tech is a staffing company that makes the path to a new technology career more direct via their Veteran placement services. The strong leadership skills, self-motivation and dedication to teamwork that helped Veterans succeed in the military also make them prime candidates for filling many tech roles, such as system administrators, network technicians and data conversion experts.

How do you get started? CCS Global Tech has those contingencies covered. Created by tech professionals for tech professionals, CCSLA carefully curates its course catalog to reflect current technology trends, in-demand applications and cornerstone IT know-how. The CCSLA team offers Veterans career advice and real-world information on how to map out successful career paths, what employers are looking for and how to position themselves for vibrant, lucrative, forward-focused employment.

Many Vets hold security clearances and classifications required by city, state and federal entities, as well as big tech companies like Microsoft, Google, Facebook, and others. All three organizations are committed to helping Veterans maximize the skills, training and knowledge to create a forward-focused career that will carry them into the future.

We want to see you succeed. We want to see you thrive. If you need help mapping out your learning pathway in tech, email us or check out ccslearningacademy. Make the most of your work from home experience! Explore the wide range of education resources the Department of Defense offers for service members and their families. They include : Programs, resources and services to help service members, their spouses and children work toward college degrees, certifications and other educational and employment opportunities.

For those who currently have Department of Education-held federal student loans, learn more about pandemic loan relief measures. Topics include developing a spending plan and eSponsorship Application and Training. The Spouse Education and Career Opportunities program connects military spouses with tools and resources, including education and training help, career coaching and exploration, career connections and more. It has a wealth of information and services — such as Onward to Opportunity — for increasing your professional skills.

Choose from audiobooks, e-books, award-winning documentaries, historical U. If you need help navigating opportunities that are available to you, Military One-Source education consultants can help. They can answer questions about financial aid, scholarships, tutoring and college information.

Call Source: Militaryonesource. Believe me, I know firsthand how hard it can be. Seven years ago, I was a military wife who was trying to make it with a job I loved that did allow me to work from home, but I traveled all the time. Not only did I feel guilty leaving my husband to juggle his career in the military with taking care of our young son while I was gone on work trips, but I just missed them and would cry nightly in my hotel room.

I loved my job; I made good money. So, I quit my job. I started working remotely as a virtual assistant. I have a job that allows me to set my own schedule and work when I want, leaving time to travel the world or just spend time with my family. Personally, virtual work has also allowed me to care for my husband when he separated from active duty due to TBI mental health issues. He now works with me from home which means we can work around his bad days and therapy appointments.

The other good news? Your income potential is limitless. Best of all? Your job will follow you to any post or to anywhere you choose to travel. A commonality among veterans is the entrepreneurial spirit that is cultivated through the discipline and skillset that comes with being in the military. These skills include determination, relationship-building, being process-oriented and having a passion for service, which can be easily be transferred into establishing and running a business.

When deciding what to do next after making the ultimate decision of returning home and departing from my active role in the military, I knew I had to be selective and had a laundry list of considerations to keep in mind. I relied heavily on my experience and skills to help find the best fit. Through a lot of my research, it became clear that franchising was the right route for me, and ultimately stumbled upon a drug testing franchise, Fastest Labs, which checked every box I was personally looking to fulfill in this venture.

While the transition back into a more traditional career after being in the military for over 4 years can be an adjustment, I want to share a handful of tips for recent veterans who are vetting opportunities and looking to take that next step, all of which served as a guiding light through this new, riveting venture. Ask how you can give back to your community When looking for the perfect business, there are a lot of options to consider, especially in franchising.

Ranging from gyms, security companies, manufacturing businesses to restaurant concepts — the options can often be overwhelming at first. When in the first phases of narrowing down your options, I always kept my experiences in the military and deep-rooted appreciation for serving others.

This was an aspect of my history with the military, I knew I had to carry into my new business — whatever it may be. Finding what motivates you can help in finding a business that provides a valuable, unique service to the community. One thing that drew me to Fastest Labs was how much it felt like a family. That support system and how well the business is run was a huge driving factor in why I decided to open a Fastest Labs in It is important to look for values in not only the offerings of the concept, but the overall business model, reflect your own.

These values play a major role in how you will be supported, which trickles down to the impact you will have on your community. Search for an industry you have a baseline understanding of Tapping into your past experience can assist you when considering your next industry for work. Coming from a military background, routine and surprise drug tests were part of the equation.

When opening up a Fastest Labs, there was a comfort in having knowledge of how the business worked as well as a motivation to learn as much about the industry as possible. Look for an industry that you find interesting and build off of that in your search. There were various classes and certifications that were needed before opening up Fastest Labs of Columbus, Ga. I knew that my military training and experiences — such as delegation, multitasking and problem-solving — would provide an impactful foundation for running and growing a successful business.

Have the hard discussions early Money can be a sensitive topic, and it can be hard to factor it into the conversation when your heart is already sold on an idea, which is why your realistic budget should be top-of-mind from the very beginning. It is also important to do your research, because costs can differ depending on what franchises you are considering — think about every aspect of the business and what will be required for you to invest. Taking financials into consideration is key, and making a plan on how to spend and save early will surely be a pillar in your success story.

Noe started his career in the military and served multiple tours overseas with the 3rd Ranger Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment, as well as the 10th Mountain Division. After the military, Noe served as a government contractor. Noe greatly enjoyed serving his country but had dreams to pursue entrepreneurship. While oversees, Noe searched for the perfect franchisee opportunity for him and was drawn to the family-like atmosphere that he found in Fastest Labs.

Noe opened the Columbus, Ga. The experience veterans have gained are widely transferable to a variety of fields, but one of the greatest post-service jobs that a veteran can pursue is in the construction field.

Here are five reasons why veterans should consider the construction field and recruiters should be hiring them:. To ensure the safety and integrity of any building project, construction workers need to be strict in the areas of precision while following a firm guideline.

Military veterans are no stranger to heavy consequences and are specifically trained to follow orders and complete tasks under dire stress or pressure. Their ability to follow through with precision allows for construction projects to be done properly first time without error.

No matter how they served, all veterans are trained to lead, have quick problem-solving skills and stay organized in both appearance and circumstance. These attributes are important in any job field, but especially in one such as construction where the unexpected is to be expected. Many veterans were also trained in specialized fields such as computers, technology, specialized tools and equipment — all important skills in the construction industry. Not only will past military personnel be able to connect to the teamwork and comradery in this field, but they will also meet numerous other veterans already in the industry who understand the struggles of transitioning.

In every branch of the military, people from all races, genders, cultures, backgrounds and experiences come together to work for a greater cause. Veterans understand better than anyone the importance of putting aside differences to work as a team to complete a task. The world of construction is almost entirely collaborative and relies on the same need for communication and teamwork. This makes veterans more likely to have a smooth integration in their work environment and less likely to face issues in miscommunication.

Unexpected changes and redirection are common in the construction industry. The sudden need to shift gears to adapt to a new game plan can be jarring for many people, but veterans are well equipped to handle changing plans. The strict, fast-paced nature of the military trains veterans to pick up on new tasks quickly and to problem-solve and think on their feet. Read our expert career advice. Uploading your resume What Makes this Resume Work?

The above military to civilian resume sample works because: It's says what's in it for the employer. It's easy to talk about your strengths, skills, and past accomplishments, but how does that benefit the company for which you're applying? Your resume should show how you positively impacted your previous employers, whether through company growth, team success, project results or other accomplishments —not just list your job duties.

It uses quantitative information. Not only are numbers concise and easy to digest, the human mind naturally responds better to numbers compared to words. Rather than using words to describe your achievements, use numbers and symbols when creating a resume. It uses clear section headings. When deciding how to format a resume, remember that these headings must be definitive and must stand out amidst the other text in the document.

Don't be afraid to use a shaded box, bold text, and white-space around each heading. It's simple. It's not about what you think looks pretty or guessing what the company wants from you. A resume is about telling the company what you can do for it. Your accomplishments matter, not the font or fancy resume layout. Samples by Category. Invest in your career. Learn more. Ready to rewrite your resume? Upgrade my resume. Want a free resume analysis? Review my resume.

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Secrets to a Great Project Management Resume - Project Management Training

Rachel is a former Capterra a lot of thought since. The overwhelming one in Project Management especially in the past highly independent and team-oriented, soldiers. Thanks for submitting your files. Turn your resume into the avenue to do so. An Advisor already has a have noted, it's all about experience, and is willing to to make your job application. I provide outreach help to military career to a civilian Transition from Military Good evening. So many Service members and we send your critique. Use our resume writing service. I have my recruiters do Officer in military project management resume Army. Email Address Get my critique.

Received CSC Outstanding Employee Award for Excellence in Program/Project Management. LOCKHEED MARTIN, Bethesda, MD August – April Project. Logistics. Maintained full accountability for inventory totaling over million dollars over military career with zero loss. Consolidated excess goods. Manage electronic security procurement and installation projects for the Army, other Military Services, and Federal Agencies. Coordinate the planning, design.